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Mathematics

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Elective Courses

Mathematics

  • 6th Grade Math

    In 6th Grade, students will focus on four critical areas:

    1. Students will learn how to connect ratio and rate to whole number multiplication and division and using concepts of ratio and rate to solve problems;
    2. complete understanding of division of fractions and extending the notion of number to the system of rational numbers, which includes negative numbers;
    3. write, interpret, and use expressions and equations; and
    4. develop understanding of statistical thinking.

    Additionally, students will also learn to describe and summarize numerical data sets, identifying clusters, peaks, gaps, and symmetry, considering the context in which the data were collected. Students in Grade 6 also build on their work with area in elementary school by reasoning about relationships among shapes to determine area, surface area, and volume.

  • 7th Grade Math

    In 7th Grade, students will focus on four critical areas:

    1. Students will develop understanding of and applying proportional relationships;
    2. develop understanding of operations with rational numbers and working with expressions and linear equations;
    3. solve problems involving scale drawings and informal geometric constructions, and working with two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume; and
    4. drawing inferences about populations based on samples
  • 8th Grade Math

    In 8th Grade, students will focus on three critical areas:

    1. formulating and reasoning about expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations;
    2. grasping the concept of a function and using func- tions to describe quantitative relationships;
    3. analyzing two- and three-dimensional space and figures using distance, angle, similarity, and congruence, and understanding and applying the Pythagorean Theorem.
  • Pre Algebra

    This class will review basic arithmetic operations and introduce students to basic algebra concepts necessary for success in high-school math courses.  Topics covered in this course include the properties of numbers and of equality; simplifying expressions; solving equations and inequalities; relations and functions; graphing equations and inequalities; systems of equations; irrational numbers; and properties of exponents.

  • Algebra I

    This is a first year algebra course in which you will learn to reason symbolically.

    This course is designed to emphasize the study of multiple representations of linear and non-linear functions. The key content involves writing, solving, and graphing linear and quadratic equations, including systems of two linear equations in two unknowns. Quadratic equations are solved by factoring, completing the square, graphically, or by application of the quadratic formula. The course also includes study of monomial and polynomial expressions, inequalities, exponents, functions, rational expressions, ratio, and proportion.

    Topics include:

    1. operations with real numbers,
    2. linear equations and inequalities,
    3. relations and functions,
    4. polynomials,
    5. algebraic fractions, and
    6. nonlinear equations. Algebraic skills are applied in a wide variety of problem-solving situations.
  • Algebra II

    Algebra 2 is the culminating course in a sequence of three required math courses for high school students.

    Building on their work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, students extend their understanding of functions to include quadratics with complex solutions, polynomials, rational, and radical functions. Students use their knowledge of expressions that define functions and expand their abilities to model situations and solve equations, including solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms. They apply methods from probability and statistics to draw inferences and conclusions from data.

  • Geometry

    Geometry is the second in a series of three required math courses for high school students, focusing on Euclidean geometry both with and without coordinates.

    Building on standards from middle school, students will use transformations in the coordinate plane and proportional reasoning to develop a formal understanding of similarity and congruence. Students will use a variety of formats, including geometric proof, to prove theorems involving lines, angles, triangles, and other polygons. Students will develop and explain formulas related to circles and volume and use those formulas to solve real-world problems. Using the concepts of distance, midpoint, and slope, students will derive the equation of a circle, and algebraically verify geometric relationships. Students will formalize probability rules from middle school and use these rules to understand independence and conditional probability.

  • Pre Calculus

    This full-year long course in Pre-Calculus focuses on the mastery of critical skills and exposure to new skills necessary for success in subsequent math courses, including Calculus. Throughout the course, Common Core standards will be taught and reinforced and the student will be expected to learn how to apply the concepts in real-life situations. Topics will include using the unit circle to extend the domain of trigonometric functions to include all real numbers. Students will create inverses of trigonometric functions and use the inverse functions to solve trigonometric equations that arise in real-world problems. Students will learn the derivation of the trigonometric formula for the area of a triangle and the proof and usage of the Laws of Sines and Cosines to solve problems. There will be lessons on the proof and usage of the addition, subtraction, double, and half- angle formulas to solve problems. Students will perform operations on matrices, use them in applications, and represent and solve systems of equations via matrices. There will be the derivation of the equations of conic
    sections and the method to solve systems of a linear and quadratic equation in two variables. Students will perform operations on vectors and use the operations to represent various quantities. Finally, they will extend their study of probability by computing and interpreting probabilities of compound events.

English & Language Arts

  • 6th Grade English

    Welcome to the 6th Grade ELA course. This course is designed to lead students through the introduction, development and mastery of the International Common Core Standards for 6th grade ELA.

    There are five major categories that students will develop throughout the course of
    the year: literature, informational texts, language, speaking and language, and writing. Students will be able to demonstrate and mold their skills through live classes and non live classes, different genres, topics, and grade-level complex material. At the end of the course, all students will be able to demonstrate the mastery of all of the standards.

  • 7th Grade English

    Welcome to the 7th Grade ELA course. This course is designed to lead students through the introduction, development and mastery of the International Common Core Standards for 7th grade ELA.

    There are five major categories that students will develop throughout the course of
    the year: literature, informational texts, language, speaking and language, and writing. Students will be able to demonstrate and mold their skills through live classes and non-live classes, different genres, topics, and grade-level complex material. At the end of the course, all students will be able to demonstrate the mastery of all the standards.

  • 8th Grade English

    Welcome to the 8th Grade ELA course. This course is designed to lead students through the introduction, development and mastery of the International Common Core Standards for 8th grade ELA.

    There are five major categories that students will develop throughout the course of
    the year: literature, informational texts, language, speaking and language, and writing. Students will be able to demonstrate and mold their skills through live classes and non-live classes, different genres, topics, and grade-level complex material. At the end of the course, all students will be able to demonstrate the mastery of all the standards.

  • English I

    The 9th grade English Language Arts course is designed to take students on a journey through a range of texts and writings to develop their ability to be analytical and to be a creator.

    Students will read a range of texts from the age of William Shakespeare, to the American Revolution, to the late 1800s while exploring different themes, author’s point of view, and experiences. Students will work on a range of writings to develop themselves as an author and their own point of view. This course introduces and develops students’ skills for the tenth grade ELA course.

  • English II

    The 10th grade English Language Arts course is designed to develop a wide range of reading, writing, and grammar skills.

    Students will read works from Mark Twain, William Shakespeare, Shirley Jackson and Guy de Maupassant while also exploring speeches and informational texts from the Civil Rights Movement. Each unit will allow the student to consider their own beliefs and opinions and express them through their own written works and discussions within the class. Throughout each unit, students will begin to master the concepts that they have been building on since the beginning of ninth grade English.

  • English III

    The 11th grade English Language Arts course is designed to take students to a higher level of learning to prepare them for college entrance exams and post-secondary educational opportunities.

    The course will feature excerpts from dramas and novels to gauge why an author makes certain literary decision in sculpting characters, setting and plot line. Opposingly, informational texts, including historical and scientific texts, will allow a student to consider the choices an author makes for a targeted audience. Students will also use their new analytical skills and apply them to decisions that they will make as a writer and the audience that they are targeting. Students’ will begin to gain a sense of collegiate writing and the communicative skills necessary for careers after high school.

  • English IV

    The 12th grade English Language Arts course is designed to build on the concepts from eleventh grade English.

    Students will study literary pieces, like Beowulf, and informational texts, such as Supreme Court Cases, that point to how our nation was shaped into the structure it has today. Students will further distinguish between opinion, fact and argument within texts and their own writing. This will help students to master the concepts that they have been building on and to help prepare them as they take the steps towards post-secondary opportunities, whether it is writing a resume or a college entrance essay.

Social Studies

  • US Government

    This senior level class will teach students critically analyze the structure and processes of American government. In particular, students will become familiar with the Constitution, the political structures and processes, and the current principles and problems of state and national government. Students will become aware of their citizenship duties and the importance of effective involvement in politics. Through e-resources, educational activities, discussions and readings, students will develop the skills and attitudes necessary to function effectively as responsible, ethical and contributing citizens of the community, state and nation.

  • World History

    The grade 9-12 World History course is an overview of our global community’s past development and how people, places and patterns of life have impacted our modern society.

    The course is separated into units covering the following topic areas: The Beginnings of Civilization, Ancient Government and Early Societies, The Middle Ages in Europe and the Middle East, Empires in Africa and Asia, the Renaissance and Reformation, the Age of Absolutism and Nationalism, the Industrial Revolution and the Revolutions of Europe and Latin America, the Growth of Western Democracy, The Age of Imperialism. The World at War, the Cold War, Globalization and Perspectives on the Present and the world today will end the course. The focus of this course is the study of the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times until the present. Through e-resources, educational activities, discussions and readings, students will develop historical and geographical skills to analyze and explore the history of the world.

  • World Geography

    In World Geography Studies, students examine people, places, and environments at local, regional, national, and international levels. More analytical and impactful than a physical geography course, World Geography holistically examines how geography effects the world through five recursive units: Culture, Economics, Science & Technology, Religion, Politics & Borders, Government & Society, and Citizenship & the Future.

    Including many elements of AP Human Geography, this is an ideal course for ninth or tenth grade students who are unsure if they want to tackle AP material. Frequent multi-source analytical essays and exposure to difficult concepts, such as Malthus’ and Weber’s Theories, prepares students well for their first AP course after completion of World Geography.

    Every student will use problem-solving and decision-making skills to ask and answer geographic questions to help understand the past and their role as a citizen in the future society.

Science

  • Life Science

    As students enter middle school, this life science course introduces students to scientific inquiry and engineering practices in all living systems through the utilization of the Next Generation Science Standards.

    The students will learn how to use these scientific reasoning skills through the four core areas of life science. The core areas include:

    1. From Molecules to Organisms: Understanding how cells contribute to the function of living organisms;
    2. Ecosystems: Understanding how systems operate to meet the needs of living organisms in an ecosystem;
    3. Heredity: Understanding how living organisms pass traits on from one generation to the next and
    4. Biological Evolution: Understanding how living organisms change over time in response to the environment.

    In this year-long course, students will develop a mastery of the disciplinary core areas of life science through scientific and engineering practice and interdisciplinary concepts in the physical and earth sciences.

  • Physical Science

    Physical science is an introduction to the basic concepts in chemistry and physics.

    The curriculum is divided into the chemistry units and physics units.
    In chemistry, the students will examine the classification of matter, the nature of energy, and viscosity, as well as, observe chemical reactions and draw conclusions about what happened in those reactions.
    In the physics units, students investigate changes in energy, identifying potential and kinetic energy, and the transfer of energy.
    Students will explore the properties of a simple machine. They learn the factors that influence force. In their exploration, they also determine the effect of pulleys and levers. In their laboratory investigations, they demonstrate knowledge of these concepts through observation and data reporting. Students will also explore the different kinds of waves and learn the factors that influence waves. In this course students will discover that the physical world does not work independent of its components.

  • Earth and Space Science

    Earth and Space Science is the study of the processes that shape the Earth and explain the universe.

    This course will explore the four main branches of Earth Science: geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy. In this course, students will learn in detail about the Earth’s interior and the theory of plate tectonics. Students will learn about Earth’s systems and their interactions. Students will also explore theories that describe the formation of Earth, our Solar System, and the universe.

  • Biology

    Biology is the science that studies living things and systems. This one-year course focuses on the process of scientific investigation through the study of living things and the world in which we live. Learning will take place through teacher-class discussion via teacher guided PowerPoints, reading the textbook and taking notes, laboratory and simulated investigations, videos, computer activities, supplemental reading, and quizzes and tests. Good study habits will be developed and are essential to understanding and learning the information presented in class.
  • Chemistry

    Students explore the fundamental principles of chemistry which characterize the properties of matter and how it reacts. Computer-based and traditional laboratory techniques are used to obtain, organize and analyze data. Conclusions are developed using both qualitative and quantitative procedures. Topics include, but are not limited to: measurement, atomic structure, electron configuration, the periodic table, bonding, gas laws, properties of liquids and solids, solutions, chemical reactions, and acids and bases.

  • Physics

    Students in high school grades 11-12 may continue their Science education with Physics. This course has prerequisites of Algebra I and completion or concurrent enrollment in Geometry. Topics included in this course are motion, forces, energy, momentum, electricity, magnetism, waves, and nuclear physics. There is an electronic textbook for this course. Printable study guides are available for each major unit. This Physics class is aligned with Next Generation Science Standards. The class has Physics Interactives to aid in learning concepts along with labs that will be assigned. Practical application to life will be visited with concepts in this class.

Advanced Placement

  • AP Statistics

    The AP Physics 1 course is an algebra-based college-level physics class that meets a minimum of 225 minutes per week for the entire school year.

    The course follows the specific physics topics outlined by the College Board and corresponds with an introductory level college physics course. AP Physics 1 is designed around six big ideas that are a combination of foundational principles of physics and essential science principles to support student conceptual learning of physics as it relates to real-world scenarios. The following topics are covered throughout the year in the course: a. Kinematics b. Dynamics of Force and Motion c. Universal of Gravitation d. Simple Pendulum and Mass-Spring Systems e. Impulse, Linear Momentum, and Conservation of Linear Momentum f. Work, Energy, and Conservation of Energy g. Rotational Kinematics and Conservation of Angular Momentum h. Electrostatics i. Simple DC Circuits & j. Waves and Sounds. Students will conduct lab and inquiry-based investigations on these general topics to gain a deeper understanding of physics applications. At the conclusion of the course, students will take the AP Physics 1 Exam, which evaluates their knowledge on all physics topics covered throughout the year in the course.

  • AP Chinese

    The AP Chinese Language and Culture course is designed to be comparable to fourth semester college/university courses in Mandarin Chinese, or the point at which students would typically complete about 250 hours of college-level instruction.

    The course prepares students to demonstrate their level of Chinese proficiency across the three communicative modes (Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational) and the five goal areas (Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities) as outlined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century. The course aims to provide students with many opportunities to further develop their proficiency across the full range of language skills while learning about Chinese culture and society. Topics to learn in this course include School/Family, Foods/Sports, Festivals/Customs, Travel/Society, History/Literature, and Environmental Protection/Energy Conservation.

World Languages

  • Elementary ASL (K – 3rd Grade)

    This course is the first American Sign Language course in the sequence.

    Its primary focus will be on communication in ASL. Students will focus on interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational signing tasks. Students will be able to communicate in ASL and understand cultural practices appropriate to their development level. Students will learn topics such as colors, foods, animals., daily routines, ASL phrases and ASL Sentences.

  • Elementary ASL (4th – 5th Grade)

    In this course students, will continue their introduction to American Sign Language with focus on building their receptive and expressive skills.

    Students will have 10 units of study. Each unit consists of new vocabulary, grammar and expressive skills. Through teacher lead activities students reinforce vocabulary and sentences. Students also learn topics of cultural studies of the American Deaf Community.

  • Elementary Chinese

    Elementary school students build a foundation of Chinese language skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking with age-appropriate, engaging lessons.

    The first half of the course introduces Lan-Lan and Zhong- Zhong, two pandas who guide students through the new material and provide context for young learners. Through games, songs and chants, students acquire new sentence patterns in basic Chinese. The patterns are reinforced through pair work, group work and individual activities. Chinese characters, including stroke order and radicals (building blocks of characters) are introduced from the start, and students have their choice of practice methods, air-writing, writing on paper or on the whiteboard in class. Where needed, culturally appropriate use of the language is introduced.

  • ASL I

    The purpose of ASL 1 is to provide a foundation of signing production and comprehension.

    The first year students will be able to communicate and interact within the context of a variety of everyday situations such as family, school life, eating, shopping, and traveling. The first year goal is to develop the foundational semiotic skills to help students transition to year two ASL class. The first year of ASL will be the introduction of basic in- quiry, following directions and developing elementary receptive skills after 8 units of instruction. Moreover, stu- dents will gain an increased understanding of Deaf culture, with specific attention paid to education in the Deaf community, development of assisted communication technology, and interactions between Deaf and hearing communities. The three years also all touch on the historical and political development of ASL and Deaf culture.

  • ASL II

    The purpose of ASL 2 is predicated on an increased upward trajectory of signing production and comprehension, and an introduction of the ASL gloss.

    Through the second year students will increase their communication and interaction within the context of a variety of everyday situations such as family, school life, eating, shop- ping, and traveling. Although the second year is a natural complement of the first it does evolve with student understanding and language abstraction is enhanced during the 8 units of instruction . In addition, students will gain an increased understanding of Deaf culture, with specific attention paid to education in the Deaf communi- ty, development of assisted communication technology, and interactions between Deaf and hearing communi- ties. The three years also all touch on the historical and political development of ASL and Deaf culture.

  • ASL III

    ASL 3 is the natural progression of the prior two years of instruction.

    There is a broader and bolder expectation of ASL expressive and receptive learning. Students will be able to work within the context of the ASL gloss and follow directions through the dialogic process to enhance their ASL language skills. Students will be asked to work more closely with peers and develop projects that more deeply elaborate their understanding of ASL and its inextricable linkage to Deaf culture. Moreover, students will be required to intrinsically motivate themselves to demonstrate mastery and proficiency after 8 more units of study.

  • ASL IV

    This course is detail oriented and advances the instructional ASL component delving into ASL expressive Language and the development of receptive expressive skills.

    ASL 4 is demanding and requires the maximum ef- fort from students by engaging their internal motivation and promoting a critical and reflective view of their ASL skill. This course emphasizes fluency and a smoothness in communication requiring technical improvements in student language. This course, as does our prior 3 courses, cultivates student understanding of Deaf culture and its relationship/complement to ASL language. Students are encouraged to go into the Deaf community and locate experiences with members of the Deaf community to more finely shape their language development.

  • Spanish I

    In this beginning level course, the primary goal is to build a foundation of basic Spanish comprehension.

    Students will build their Spanish language proficiency through interpersonal, interpretive and presentational communication. They will interact in spoken and written conversations, learn to interpret and analyse the lan- guage and present information in Spanish. These skills will be used for the purposes of socializing, providing information, and expressing personal feelings and opinions. Students will learn to feel comfortable expressing themselves in Spanish, whether it is their name, their age, the date, the weather or their feelings. Therefore, students will be able to comprehend language consisting of basic vocabulary in face-to-face conversation as well as initiate and engage in simple conversations. In addition to learning Spanish vocabulary and introductory grammar, students will also explore the culture of the Spanish-speaking community.

  • Spanish II

    In the second level of Spanish, students are introduced to new vocabulary and grammatical concepts that will add depth to their communication, comprehension and reading skills.

    They will continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in the three areas of communication. In order to engage the students in a true interest of the language, they will be exposed to the history and culture of Spanish-speaking countries. Therefore, the students will develop cross-cultural skills and understanding to allow a deeper understanding of the language. In addition to reviewing previously acquired concepts, as students go into the second level of Spanish, they will also be able to comprehend the main idea of more extended conversations with some un- familiar vocabulary and structures as well as cognates of English words. They will learn how to use repetition, rephrasing, and nonverbal cues to derive or convey meaning in Spanish. They will also be able to initiate and engage in more complex conversations.

  • Spanish III

    Finally, during the third level of Spanish, students will be exposed to reading and writing in Spanish for the purposes of socializing, providing and acquiring information, expressing personal feelings and opinions, and getting others to adopt a course of action.

    The course will begin with a complete review of prior levels. Students will then immerse themselves in highly contextualized language, delving into adapted and original written work and multimedia. Therefore, students will be able to understand the main idea and some details of simple informative materials written for native speakers, as well as compose short and informal messages to exchange information with Spanish-speaking people.

  • Latin II

    Latin II expands the vocabulary and grammar from Latin I.

    Students continue to translate ever more challenging stories from the life of Horace while continuing to focus on Roman history, classical mythology, and English derived from Latin. Grammar focuses on the passive voice, the subjunctive mood, the use of the participle and the infinitive. Discussion boards continue and students have the opportunity for group participation activities and oral Latin practice. The course generally follows the OXFORD LATIN COURSE PART II and the successful completion of Latin 2A and 2B earns 1 unit of credit.

  • Latin III

    Latin III covers the Roman writers Catullus, Ovid, Vergil, and Cicero. Selections are translated from each author in unedited Latin.

    The first unit of the course reviews all Latin grammar so that students feel prepared to translate unedited Latin text no matter their Latin 1 and 2 preparation. This course qualifies for pre-AP designation with student expectations to include:

    1. Writing literal English translations of Latin.
    2. Scansion of meters.
    3. Identifying figures of speech and metrical effects.
    4. Analyzing the structure of a poem.
    The final exam is a final essay project where the student must demonstrate his appreciation of classical literary excellence. The course resources are found in the OXFORD LATIN READER. Successful completion of Latin 3A and 3B will earn 1 unit of credit.

  • German I

    This is a beginning level course that will introduce you to a variety of areas of language learning.

    In this course, you will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through activities. The course is divided into two segments with 3 units in each. Throughout the six units of material (Greetings and Farewells, Dates and Numbers, Weather, Time, Colors and Place in the City), you will learn to express yourself using vocabulary, present-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is covered throughout the course. We will cover German speaking countries and their culture, people, holidays, geography and history.

  • German II

    This course follows Proximity Learning German 1 or similar. It is a semi-intermediate level course that will introduce you to a variety of areas of language learning.

    In this course, you will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through activities. The course is divided into two segments with 3 units in each. Throughout the six units of material (Family and Friends, Food and Drink, Free time and Hobbies, and Home and School, Daily Schedule and Routine and Pets and Animals), you will learn to express yourself using vocabulary, pres- ent-tense, future-tense and past-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is covered throughout the course. In German 2, we will shift our focus from German speaking countries to regions and cities and their culture, people, holidays, geography and history.

  • German III

    This course follows Proximity Learning German 2 or similar. It is an intermediate level course that will introduce you to a variety of areas of language learning.

    In this course, you will learn listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills through activities. The course is divided into two segments with 3 units in each. Throughout the six units of material (Sports and Games, Body and Health, People and Nationalities, Poetry and Literature, House and Home, Shopping, Travel and Free time), you will learn to express yourself using vocabulary, present-tense, future-tense and past-tense verbs, articles, and adjectives. Grammar is introduced and practiced with a variety of learning styles in mind. Culture is covered throughout the course. In German 3, we will shift our focus from German speaking countries, regions, cities and their culture to history. We will at German poetry and literature to this segment as well. In addition to live lessons, there are video lessons in each unit.

  • French I

    French 1 introductory course prepares novice learners to use the language in real-life situations and to practice the four key areas of foreign language study: speaking, listening, writing and reading, through communication tasks performed in individual, pair and collaborative modes.

    In each unit, students will learn about a specific topic: daily life, art, food, music, sports and language, become aware of the Francophone world and its cultures, and will gain an understanding of their own culture through cultural comparisons, research and projects. This online course provides opportunities to communicate in the target language via online tools and interac- tive games and prepares students to practice the correct and effective use of technology. The course has been aligned to National Standards for Learning Languages set by the ACTFL.

  • French II

    French 2 intermediate course is a review of French 1 material and further prepares learners to attain proficiency in speaking, listening, writing and reading through diverse communication tasks and collaborative work.

    Through each unit, students will continue their acquisition of new structures and vocabulary about daily life, art, food, music, sports, and deepen their awareness of the Francophone world cultures. In addition, students will gain an understanding of their own culture through cultural comparisons, research and projects. This online course provides means to communicate in the target language via online tools and prepares students to practice the correct and effective use of technology. The course has been aligned to National Standards for Learning Languages set by the ACTFL.

  • French III

    French 3 advanced course will focus, in each unit, on real-life use of language in the four key areas of language of study : speaking, listening, writing and reading.

    Through French web sites and authentic aural and written material, students will research and present detailed written and oral information, in diverse time frames, about family, friends, society, art, technology and culture. Interactive games, online tools as well as independant work and collaborative projects will reinforce new vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities. Each unit engages students to further explore, compare, contrast and understand the multiple perspectives and cultures of the contemporary Francophone world. The course has been aligned to National Standards for Learning Languages set by the ACTFL.

  • Japanese I

    Japanese 1 provides a foundation of listening comprehension, reading comprehension, writing, and speaking in modern Japanese.

    In this first year course, students will learn to communicate and interact within the context of a variety of everyday situations such as family, school life, eating, shopping, and traveling. They will acquire skills in culturally appropriate language and behavior in various Japanese settings. Students will also acquire skills to communicate at an abstract level and talk about their own feelings and opinions in Japanese. With the completion of Japanese 1, students will be able to read and write all Hiragana and Katakana. They will also begin reading and writing characters (Kanji) in a systematic, progressive way.

  • Japanese II

    The Japanese 2 Course aims to expand all four language skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing.

    Students are expected to express their own meaning fluently using the structures learned in Japanese 1 while expanding their vocabulary and continue to strengthen their foundation in grammar and sentence structure. Culturally appropriate communication is reinforced throughout the Japanese 2 course, building on the knowledge of cultural differences and similarities from Japanese 1. Communication skills and strategies are introduced to increase students’ fluency and create a broader foundation from which students can further their studies. The curriculum aims to create efficient, independent language learners who can take charge of their continued learning at the end of the course.

  • Chinese I

    Chinese 1 is part of a four-course series that takes students from novice through the upper intermediate level of proficiency in Mandarin Chinese.

    Through the four levels, students will be provided a foundation of listening comprehension, reading comprehension, writing, and speaking in modern standard Chinese so that they are able to communicate and interact within the context of a variety of everyday situations. In Chinese 1, students will be first introduced characteristics of Chinese language, and then learn topics about common greetings, family, dates/times, sports and colors. By the end of the full year, students are expected to learn to speak and read approximately 503 new words/phrases, and learn to write approximately 205 words. Through the study of Chinese, students will also understand how Chinese as a language relates to, and is positioned in, Chinese cultures.

  • Chinese II

    Chinese 2 will anticipate an increased introduction of Chinese characters and demands for textual literacy.

    Thematic units for Chinese 2 include Shopping, Health/Fitness, Where Things Are, School Life, Weather/ Seasons, and Transportation. By the end of the full year, students are expected to learn to speak and read approximately 600 new words/phrases, and learn to write approximately 300 words. Chinese 2 students will use richer vocabulary and longer sentences to describe a variety of topics learned; furthermore, they will be given opportunities to use Chinese to express their opinions about, for examples, their preference of shopping methods, ideal school life/extra-curriculum, and favorite transportation means. Students will not only examine and understand how Chinese as a language relates to the culture, but also compare Chinese culture with American culture.

  • Chinese IV

    Chinese 4 further builds upon the foundation of listening comprehension, reading comprehension, writing, and speaking in modern standard Mandarin Chinese formed throughout levels 1, 2, and 3.

    This course significant- ly diverges from levels 1 – 3 in two areas. First, the level 4 course introduces content with a greater emphasis on authentic texts. This authentic material brings with it a correspondingly greater number of vocabulary items and increased focus on literacy in Chinese characters. In addition, this course also diverges from the previous three years in terms of asynchronous content. For the first time, students are exposed to workbook exercises which are closely modeled on those found on major exams assessing proficiency in Chinese, including AP and SAT II, as well as the mainland China HSK exam assessing proficiency in Chinese as a foreign language.

Advanced Placement

  • Computer Programming I

    Intro to Creative Coding I – (semester I)

    In Creative Coding I high school course, students learn the essential foundations of computer science and basic programming with a focus on identifying how code connects to and can enhance their existing interests and future ambitions. While being designed with multiple standards (including Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice) in mind, the curriculum allows students to learn JavaScript through projects in which they can express themselves. For high school students, these projects are organized into portfolios to apply for college. Once students complete the Creative Coding I course they will have learned the material equivalent to a semester long intro to programming course in college and will be able to program in JavaScript. Students learn the fundamentals of computer programming with an emphasis on concept building, professions in the computing field and preparing for AP CS high school courses.

    Our high school courses are A-G approved in California.

  • Computer Programming II

    Intro to Creative coding II – (semester II)

    In Creative Coding II high school course, students learn to build upon the foundational skills they learned in Creative Coding I. Aligned with common core math and the CSTA computer science standards – this course will teach students to become proficient web programmers through skills such as: 3D space, server side languages and advanced human-computer interaction. Once students complete the Creative Coding II course they will have learned the material equivalent to a semester programming course in college and will be able to program advanced JavaScript.

    Our high school courses are A-G approved in California.

  • Computer Programming II

    Intro to Creative coding II – (semester II)

    In Creative Coding II high school course, students learn to build upon the foundational skills they learned in Creative Coding I. Aligned with common core math and the CSTA computer science standards – this course will teach students to become proficient web programmers through skills such as: 3D space, server side languages and advanced human-computer interaction. Once students complete the Creative Coding II course they will have learned the material equivalent to a semester programming course in college and will be able to program advanced JavaScript.

    Our high school courses are A-G approved in California.

  • Economics/Personal Finance (one semester)

    In this course students are introduced to the five fundamental principles of economics: basic economic concepts, microeconomics, macroeconomics, international economics and personal finance.

    Students investigate how markets operate, and how investment in their own human capital impacts their future earning. Through studying the goals of a macro-economy, students will discover how the United States economy is interconnected with the global economy. Students learn how to make informed financial decisions related to career, budgeting, banking, credit, financing, insurance, investing, spending, saving, and taxes. The process of creating a budget, balance sheet and income statement, gives students the opportunity to explore the finance of business. Economics provides the basis for responsible citizenship, success in the workforce, and money management.

  • Health/PE

    Health: One semester high school course based on national standards. This course focuses on the fundamentals of health and giving students the information and skills, they need to make wise decisions related to their own personal health. Units of study will include personal health, mental, emotional, and social health, disease prevention, nutrition and physical activity, substance abuse, growth and development, and sexual health. Through this course students will work on the skills needed to help them make lifelong healthy decisions including, interpersonal skills, goal-setting, decision-making, analyzing sources, analyzing influences and advocacy.

    Physical Education: One semester high school course based on national standards. This course focuses on the fundamentals of physical education. Students will be self-selecting a variety of physical activity that best fits their interests to complete and analysis during this course. Students will be analyzing motor skills and movement patterns then developing plans on how to enhance and improve those skills and patterns. Students will be examining their own physical fitness and barriers that can prevent them in life from enhancing their own physical activity and looking at best practices for safety, so they can continue with lifelong fitness. Students will also be researching and analysis why physical activity is important to themselves and health in general and the important roles of personal responsibility, challenge, enjoyment, respect, and moral and ethical behavior within physical activity.

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Our Mission:

Equity of access to quality instruction from a certified educator.

Contact Us:

800-524-8570

support@proximity.zendesk.com

600 Congress, 14th Floor, Austin, TX 78701